Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Cedar River Watershed

It is hard to know what each child feels as they experience the Cedar River Watershed. Be sure to talk with them about their experience and most certainly create an opportunity to go experience it yourself. 

Forest Court


"The Forest Court with its trees, shrubs, native plants, a stream and Water Drum art, forms the Center's heart. The Forest Court is a quiet place of beauty, a spot from which a visitor can watch birds, listen to frogs and witness mist rising off the lake."


Douglas fir roots



 Here is a bit of history about Rattlesnake Lake.






We fully enjoyed the Cedar River Watershed hands-on exhibit. Using numbered balls as water drops, the children tracked the water cycle from the ocean, rivers, plants, our homes, water treatment plants. CRW offers a "flow through the water cycle and journey through habitats and history, as you look, listen and do" that is truly engaging, entertaining, and educational.


 Above are examples of the locals who share the water with us:  juvenile elk, black-tail deer, black bear, and beaver skulls.


 Lunch in the Forest Court with the music of the rain and rain drums.





Friday, October 25, 2019

Hundreds! Thousands! Millions! Oh my!

We are building relationships with numerals, place values, and quantities: reading, writing, building, comparing, ordering, rounding. We work collaboratively to problem solve and gain a deeper understanding, as well as have a great deal of FUN! 








Monday, October 21, 2019

Cohesion & Adhesion

Cohesion & Adhesion

The children are exploring the cohesive properties of water while observing the dome shape build up on top of coins. How many drops of water will fit?  Why does it not immediately spill off the coin? Why do water molecules appear in spherical forms? The children wonder and explore as the conversations brew around the classroom.





Friday, September 13, 2019

Lady Washington


Lady Washington



Sharing the blog with your child is an excellent way to create dialogue and learn more about 
Lady Washington.  I hope you enjoy the pictures!





Line work








Who is up above?



I spy a baggywrinkle!




All hands on deck! 






hoisting the sails





raising the sails





navigating Puget Sound


























knots
   


fanciful work with spare lines in spare time




frayed and old lines are useful and used for fenders







Baggywrinkle!



Lady Washington circumnavigated Cape Horn from northeastern North America to northwest North America to trade metals for pelts then journeyed across the Pacific Ocean to trade the pelts for tea.  One block of tea (below) would last one family a year. 




Silk also became a primary commodity, along with porcelain.
























Getting ready for the second tour.































Cedar River Watershed

It is hard to know what each child feels as they experience the Cedar River Watershed. Be sure to talk with them about their experience and...